2021 NIH Alzheimer’s Research Summit: Path to Precision Medicine for Treatment and Prevention

NIH Alzheimer’s Research Summits are key strategic planning meetings tied to the implementation of the first goal of the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease: to effectively treat and prevent Alzheimer’s disease by 2025. They bring together a multi-stakeholder community including government, industry, academia, private foundation, and patient advocacy groups, to further integrated, translational Alzheimer’s research. The goal is to accelerate the development of effective, disease-modifying, and palliative therapies for the cognitive as well as neuropsychiatric symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

The 2021 Summit will be held virtually April 19 – April 22 from 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. ET.

NIH Videocast, April 19-22, 2021, 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. ET. Registration is free and open to the public.

Register Now: Development of an NIA Practice-Based Research Network to Conduct AD/ADRD Clinical Research

The National Institute on Aging will be hosting a virtual meeting to discuss the potential and planning of a practice-based research network (PBRN) to address the disparities gap with the recruitment and retention of diverse and underserved populations to AD/ADRD clinical research studies.

PBRNs are networks of health care clinicians and practices working together to answer community-based health care questions and translate research findings into practice–they have the potential to directly engage diverse and underserved communities in AD/ADRD clinical research.

When: Friday, April 30, 2021; 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. EDT

Keynote Speakers: Lori Minasian, MD, Deputy Director for the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Prevention and Jonathan N. Tobin, PhD, Cardiovascular Epidemiologist and Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Panel Speakers: Jennifer Manly, PhD, Andrea Gilmore-Bykovskyi, PhD, RN, and Jonathan Jackson, PhD

Who Should Attend: Researchers and other stakeholders who are interested in learning about PBRNs to address AD/ADRD research gaps

Click here to register.

NIA-funded Biotech Company May Be One Step Closer to Developing a Blood-Based Diagnostic for Alzheimer’s Disease

An NIA-funded biotech company may be one step closer to developing a blood-based diagnostic for Alzheimer’s disease.  This biotech company, Amprion, recently received a Breakthrough Device Designation by the FDA for a test developed to detect the alpha-synuclein protein in the cerebrospinal fluid and bloodstream, a known biomarker for Parkinson’s disease.  Such designation by the FDA paves the way for faster development, assessment, and review, and potentially FDA approval of the technology.  Small Business grants from the NIA are enabling Amprion to adopt their test to specifically detect traces of two biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid and tau aggregates, in cerebrospinal fluid and the bloodstream.  With this new FDA designation for their technology, this company may be on track to develop a test that could help facilitate early detection and diagnosis of these devasting diseases.

FoNIA’s Message to President Obama: Increased Funding Needed for Aging Research at NIH

Members of the Friends of the National Institute on Aging have sent a letter to President Obama requesting an increase of $500 million to support biomedical, behavioral and social sciences aging research efforts at the National Institutes of Health for fiscal year 2016.

The letter points out that the 65 and older population is expected to double between 2010 and 2050.  This will come with an increase in the prevalence of diseases disproportionately affecting older people, most notably Alzheimer’s disease.

With this added investment, however, the NIH can:

  • Implement new prevention and treatment clinical trials, research training initiatives, care interventions, and genetic research studies developed to meeting the goals of the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Bolster trans-NIH initiatives developed by the NIH GeroScience Interest Group to understand basic cellular and molecular underpinnings of aging as a principal risk factor for chronic disease and to explore common mechanisms governing relationships between aging and chronic disease.
  • Understand the impact of economic concerns on older adults by examining work and retirement behavior, health and functional ability, and policies that influence individual well-being.
  • Support family caregivers by enhancing physician-family communication during end-of-life and critical care.

To read the letter, please click on the link below:
FONIA final FY 2016 OMB