NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing

On the InsideNIA blog, Dr. Akanni Clarke and Ms. Grayson Donley, both of the NIA Division of Neuroscience, provided an update on data management and sharing requirements. Effective Jan. 25, 2023, the Final NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing requires all NIH-supported research which generates scientific data to include a Data Management and Sharing Plan. A comprehensive Plan should: (1) Identify the data types and resources that will be generated; (2) Propose a timeline for sharing the data and resources; (3) Determine where the resources will be stored; and (4) Describe how the community can access the resources. If you are submitting a grant application, the post recommends familiarizing yourself with the data sharing expectations for the FOA in question. Dr. Clarke and Ms. Donley suggest reviewing the NIA webpage on data sharing resources for researchers and contacting your program officer if you have any additional questions.

NIH Releases Results of COVID-19 Impacts Survey of Extramural Researchers

The NIH Office of Extramural Research on March 25 released results from two surveys of extramural researchers seeking information on the impacts of COVID-19 to the research enterprise. Initial survey results show respondents indicated concerns about career trajectories and the ability to apply for grants; mental health impacts including from external stressors, isolation, and caregiving duties; and decreased productivity in part due to decreased access to labs and facilities. “The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have been far-reaching. Our survey findings show that the scientific workforce has not been immune to its effects. It is clear the NIH-funded community of extramural researchers has experienced inequities in several domains, with early-career researchers and those with caregiving responsibilities most affected,” Marie Bernard, MD, acting chief officer for scientific workforce diversity, and Michael Lauer, deputy director for extramural research, said in their summary of the survey results.

Advisory Committee to the NIH Director Virtual Meeting – Feb 26th

Join NIH on Friday, February 26th from 3:00PM to 5:30PM EST for a virtual meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Director focused on NIH efforts promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion. The meeting will be available to the public through NIH Videocast.
 
Meeting Agenda

3:00 PM Opening Remarks Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD, Director, NIH

3:10 PM ACD Working Group on Diversity
Marie A. Bernard, MD, Acting Chief Officer for Scientific Workforce Diversity, and Deputy Director, NIA, and Working Group Co-Chair
M. Roy Wilson, MD, President, Wayne State University, and Working Group Co-Chair

3:40 PM Promoting Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Biomedical Research—The NIH UNITE Initiative
Marie A. Bernard, MD, Acting Chief Officer for Scientific Workforce Diversity, and Deputy Director, NIA
Alfred Johnson, PhD, Deputy Director for Management, NIH
Lawrence A. Tabak, DDS, PhD, Principal Deputy Director, NIH UNITE Committee Co-Chairs

4:30 PM Discussion

5:15 PM Common Fund Concept Discussion Robert Rivers, PhD, Program Director: Office of Minority Health Research Coordination, NIDDK

5:30 PM Closing Remarks and Adjourn Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD, Director, NIH

FoNIA Applauds Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on FY 2016 NIH Funding Bill

The undersigned organizations made the following joint statement in response to Tuesday’s release of the Senate Labor, HHS Appropriations Subcommittee FY 2016 bill for the National Institutes of Health (NIH):

Our organizations unite to applaud and thank the Senate Appropriations Labor, HHS Subcommittee on its FY 2016 bill for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). We thank Subcommittee Chairman Roy Blunt and Ranking Member Patty Murray for their leadership on the bill, which includes a $2 billion increase for NIH; and, a $350 million increase for the National Institute on Aging, “a significant portion of which the Committee expects to be dedicated to Alzheimer’s disease research.”

Increased investment in preventing, treating, or curing chronic diseases of aging is one of the most effective strategies in reducing national spending on health care. The costs of care for Alzheimer’s disease alone are enormous—in 2015 Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias will cost the nation $226 billion, with half the costs borne by Medicare.

The $350 million increase for Alzheimer’s research is a significant step closer to meet the national goal of preventing and effectively treating Alzheimer’s disease by 2025 set out in the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease.

Our organizations have worked collaboratively to urge that Alzheimer’s and dementia research be a greater national priority. We look forward to continuing to work together, and with Congress and the Administration, to support the funding needed to make the 2025 goal a reality.

Alliance for Aging Research
Alzheimer’s Foundation of America
Cure Alzheimer’s Fund
Friends of the National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Leaders Engaged on Alzheimer’s Disease
USAgainstAlzheimer’s

 

Friends of the NIA Applauds House Appropriations FY 2016 Bill for NIH Funding

The undersigned organizations made the following joint statement in response to the House Labor, HHS Appropriations Subcommittee FY 2016 bill for the National Institutes of Health (NIH):

Our organizations unite to applaud and thank the House Appropriations Labor, HHS Subcommittee, on its FY 2016 bill for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). We thank Subcommittee Chairman Tom Cole and Ranking Member Rosa DeLauro for their leadership on the bill, which includes a $1.1 billion increase for NIH; a more than 25 percent increase for the National Institute on Aging to $1.5 billion; and a call for $300 million of that increase to be used for Alzheimer’s disease research.

Increased investment in preventing, treating or curing chronic diseases of aging is one of the most effective strategies in reducing national spending on health care. The costs of care for Alzheimer’s disease alone are enormous—in 2015 Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias will cost the nation $226 billion, with half the costs borne by Medicare.

The $300 million increase for Alzheimer’s research is a significant step closer to meeting the national goal of preventing and effectively treating Alzheimer’s disease by 2025 set out in the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease.

Our organizations have worked collaboratively to urge that Alzheimer’s and dementia research be a greater national priority. We look forward to continuing to work together, and with Congress and the Administration, to support the funding needed to make the 2025 goal a reality.

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America
Cure Alzheimer’s Fund
Friends of the National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Leaders Engaged on Alzheimer’s Disease
USAgainstAlzheimer’s