Statement on Appropriations Bill FY 2019

FoNIA Statement for Appropriations Bill FY 2019

 

July 2, 2018 – The Friends of the National Institute on Aging (FoNIA) sincerely appreciates the Senate Appropriations Labor, HHS and Education Subcommittee’s sustained and meaningful support for the National Institutes of Health.  We thank Subcommittee Chairman Roy Blunt and Ranking Member Patty Murray for their leadership on the research funding included in the FY 2019 appropriations bill, which includes a $2 billion increase for NIH.

The funding, approved by the full Senate Appropriations Committee on June 28, will provide for increased investment in the NIA, the lead federal agency for biomedical research on aging.  For FY 2019, the NIA is to receive $3,084,809,000 for NIA, a significant boost from the FY 2018 level of $2,574,091,000.  This investment comes at a time when scientific advances are around every corner.  We have the ability to make a real difference in people’s lives by coupling our understanding of health through the lifespan and biological aging with opportunities for increased research in new directions.  This knowledge will translate into improved care and quality of life for all of us as we age.

The FONIA is also pleased with the committee’s continued support for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias research.  NIA, in conjunction with several other institutes at NIH, is working toward the ambitious national goal of preventing and effectively treating Alzheimer’s disease by 2025, as set out in the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease.  The $425 million increase for Alzheimer’s and related dementias research enables NIA to take advantage of every breakthrough and every new piece of knowledge.

The House Appropriations Committee is expected to take up its version of the Labor, HHS, Education Appropriations bill after the July 4 recess.

Advancing the Health of an Aging Population: Groundbreaking Research Supported by the NIA

Please join the Friends of the National Institute on Aging to hear about the groundbreaking aging research that is being supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA). The NIA, one of 27 Institutes comprising the National Institutes of Health (NIH), leads the national scientific effort to promote the health and well-being of older adults. It will be held on Thursday, June 30, 2016, 2:00-3:00 p.m. at the Capitol Visitorʼs Center, SVC 201, U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C. To RSVP for the event, please go here.  To download details, please click here.

Below is an agenda of the event:

Welcome & Introductions
Kathryn Jedrziewski, Ph.D.
Chair, Friends of the NIA
Deputy Director, Pennʼs Institute on Aging

Advances at the NIA: From Bench to Bedside to Real-World Practice
Richard Hodes, M.D.
Director, National Institute on Aging

Marie A. Bernard, M.D.
Deputy Director, National Institute on Aging

Precision Medicine Approaches for Treatment of Alzheimerʼs & Parkinsonʼs
Corey McMillan, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania

Training the Next Generation
Peter M. Abadir, M.D.
Assistant Professor of Medicine,
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology

Q&A

FoNIA Applauds Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on FY 2016 NIH Funding Bill

The undersigned organizations made the following joint statement in response to Tuesday’s release of the Senate Labor, HHS Appropriations Subcommittee FY 2016 bill for the National Institutes of Health (NIH):

Our organizations unite to applaud and thank the Senate Appropriations Labor, HHS Subcommittee on its FY 2016 bill for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). We thank Subcommittee Chairman Roy Blunt and Ranking Member Patty Murray for their leadership on the bill, which includes a $2 billion increase for NIH; and, a $350 million increase for the National Institute on Aging, “a significant portion of which the Committee expects to be dedicated to Alzheimer’s disease research.”

Increased investment in preventing, treating, or curing chronic diseases of aging is one of the most effective strategies in reducing national spending on health care. The costs of care for Alzheimer’s disease alone are enormous—in 2015 Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias will cost the nation $226 billion, with half the costs borne by Medicare.

The $350 million increase for Alzheimer’s research is a significant step closer to meet the national goal of preventing and effectively treating Alzheimer’s disease by 2025 set out in the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease.

Our organizations have worked collaboratively to urge that Alzheimer’s and dementia research be a greater national priority. We look forward to continuing to work together, and with Congress and the Administration, to support the funding needed to make the 2025 goal a reality.

Alliance for Aging Research
Alzheimer’s Foundation of America
Cure Alzheimer’s Fund
Friends of the National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Leaders Engaged on Alzheimer’s Disease
USAgainstAlzheimer’s